A MOOC consists of many online spaces. This is not just for the fun of it. Social media tools have different learning/teaching purposes or benefits. Depending on these benefits it is good to use one or the other or ... like in this MOOC, use an arae of online tools to enhance the learning experience (if you want to). For even though there is a variety of tools provided for the course, you - as a participant - can just as well only use the two core course locations (the course wiki and the google group).

Here is a short list of social media tools, why you could use it in a course and how this tool addresses the knowledge age challenges of today. You are free to share it, but please use the creative commons linked to this wiki (mention the author, and use it for non-commercial goals).

Mobile Enabled Social Media Tool
Why use it
Knowledge Age Challenge Addressed
Blogs
(Examples: wordpress, blogger, posterous)
To reflect on what is learned, or what the learner thinks is of importance.
Keeping a learning archive.
Reflecting on the learning itself.
Commenting on content.
Self-regulated learning.
Lifelong Learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
.
Discussion enabler: Listserv
(Examples: google groups, yahoo groups)
This type of online tool uses e-mail to keep everyone informed. With many of the listserve’s you can choose how you want your mails to be delivered (e-mail digest: e.g. immediate, once a day, once a week), which adds to self-regulated learning.
Generating and maintaining discussions.
Getting a group feeling going via dialogue.
Enabling dialogue.
Collaboration.
Self-regulated learning.
Informal learning.
Social Networking
(examples: Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn)
Building a network of people that can add to the knowledge creation of the learner.
Enables networking.
Collaboration.
Enabling dialogue.
Informal learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Multimedia sharing
Video (e.g. YouTube, Qik).
Audio (e.g. Skype)
Pictures (e.g. Flickr)
Sharing visuals, audio and/or movies to give others an in-depth view on what is happening.
Ideal: for getting the learner to really share their own real-life experiences. Sharing videos, pictures and/or audio also allows people to construct learning snippets and share those with others.
Extra: geotagging, sharing the location of the object of the video, audio or picture that is shared. This metadata can later be used for additional learning tracks.
Collaboration.
Lifelong learning.
Informal learning.
Authentic learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Virtual meetings
(Examples: Blackboard Collaborate, Big Blue Button).
Most of the social media tools are asynchronous, but the virtual meeting tools allow synchronous communication to take place.
Ideal: for putting one person/topic expert in the picture and exchanging ideas with her/him.
Planning where to go next with a course or course topic.
Synchronizing thoughts and possible problems between all learners.
Embraces networking,
Enabling dialogues.
Lifelong learning.
Informal learning.
Authentic learning (when streamed from a location).
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Idea and content sharing
Microblogging
(Example: twitter)
Twitter allows the learner group to share short messages with one another. This can be of great use to share not only ideas, but also relevant content from other sources.
Keeping track of specific topics.
Exchanging ideas.
Generating a Q/A chats.
Embraces networking.
Enabling dialogues.
Informal learning.
Social bookmarking
(examples: Diigo.com, delicious.com)
Social bookmarking allows the learner group to find bookmarked items related to the topic at hand gathered in one place.
Ideal for organizing online resources that would otherwise be scattered across the Web.
Collaboration.
Lifelong learning,
Informal learning,
Self-regulated learning.
Practice critical filtering of content.
Collaborative content creation spaces
Google docs
Wiki’s
Wiki’s and collaborative documents offer an easy way to build substantial collaborative content. It offers an easy to read and edit space.
Building a course syllabus,
Creating collaborative papers.
Creating story boards.
Collaboration.
Enabling (written) dialogues and discussion.
Authentic learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Sharing presentations
(Examples: slideshare,
Prezi)
Sharing presentations offer an immediate way of enhancing knowledge on a certain subject.
Presentations can be part of the information resources that are shared during the course.
They can also be used to synthesize other presentations and as such organizing the major key points of a course in one point.
Lifelong learning.
Informal learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Collaborative reference managers
(Examples: Zotero, Mendeley)
For those learners interested in research or formal accreditation, reference managers offer a great way to easily pick up references and insert citations.
Easily access citations, building reference lists, creating literature reviews.
Collaboration.
Lifelong learning.
Self-regulated learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Collaborative mindmapping
(Example: mindmeister)
Planning or structuring thoughts, future steps, content.
Collaboration.
Lifelong learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.
Augmented reality additions
(Examples: Wikitude, Hoppala augmentation, Junaio)
Great for adding authentic information to geo-located spaces.
Allows learners to produce and/or get more relevant information standing in a particular space.
Authentic learning.
Lifelong learning.
Becoming active, critical content producer.